People in the Novel

Barb Nelson
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D
Denotes a character who appears inDubliners
P
Denotes a character who appears inPortrait of the Artist
Apjohn, Percy.
Childhood friend of Leopold Bloom. Apjohn and other friends appear in a dream-sequence in Circe as "The Halcyon Days." Bloom also thinks of him in Lestrygonians and three times in Ithaca. Apjohn was killed in South Africa during the Boer war.
Artifoni, Almidano.
A music teacher who encourages Stephen Dedalus to pursue a musical career in Wandering Rocks. Joyce borrowed the name from the man who was director of the Berlitz schools in Trieste and Pola where Joyce taught English. Artifoni appears again briefly in Circe.
Athos.
A dog belonging to Leopold Bloom's father, Rudolph Bloom. Rudolph asks Leopold to be kind to Athos in his suicide note. Athos was one of the musketeers in Alexander Dumas' 1844 novel The Three Musketeers.
Bannon, Alec.
Friend of Buck Mulligan first mentioned in Telemachus. He is interested in the Blooms' daughter Milly, whom he met in Mullingar. Milly refers to him as "a young student" in the letter she sends to Bloom in Calypso. Bloom thinks of Milly's young student (without naming him) in Sirens, Nausicaa, Circe and Ithaca. Bannon also appears in Circe in a group of medical students, and in Oxen of the Sun, he comes in with Mulligan after they attend another party.
Beaufoy, Philip.
A real-life London author, but the story attributed to him in Calypso ("Matcham's Masterstroke") is fictional. Beaufoy appears briefly in Circe, accusing Bloom of plagiarism. Bloom also thinks of him in Lestrygonians, Eumaeus, and Ithaca.
Bellingham, Mrs.
A well-dressed, proper society matron (fictional) who is one of Bloom's accusers in Circe. She appears with Mrs. Yelverton Barry and The Honourable Mrs. Mervyn Talboys.
Bennett, Percy.
British boxer whose match with the Irish fighter Myler Keogh is discussed throughout the day. He is a sergeantmajor stationed at the Portobello barracks. Ellmann notes that Joyce took Bennett's name from a member of the British consular staff in Zurich against whom he had a grudge; hence, his sound defeat by Keogh.
Bergan, Alf.
A real-life Dublin character and friend of the Joyce family. Bergan works for the subsheriff of Dublin. Long John Fanning. He is one of the people Leopold Bloom thinks might have sent Denis Breen a postcard inscribed with the letters U.P. In Cyclops, Bergan laughs uproariously at the prank, but never confesses to having sent it. He also appears briefly in Circe.
Best, Dr. Richard.
In 1904, Best was the real-life Assistant Director of the National Library. He later became the Director. The fictional Best participates in the literary discussion in Scylla & Charybdis and appears briefly in Circe.
Bloom, Ellen (née Higgins).
Leopold Bloom's mother (deceased). In Calypso and Lestrygonians, Bloom inventories his pockets and notes that he has his potato. When someone takes the potato in Circe, Bloom asks for its return, saying that it is a "relic of poor mama." She is mentioned in Hades, Ithaca, and Penelope; she appears briefly in Circe as a source of guilt for Bloom.
Bloom, Leopold (Poldy).
One of the three central characters of Ulysses. Bloom is half Jewish, but is uncircumcised and has been baptized as both a Protestant and a Catholic. He has held a variety of jobs; at the time of Ulysses, he sells advertising space in Dublin newspapers. He is married to Molly Bloom, and has two children, 15-year-old Milly, who lives in Mullingar and works as a photographer's assistant, and Rudy, who died eleven days after he was born a little over ten years before Ulysses. Bloom uses the alias Henry Flower in his secret correspondence with Martha Clifford. He first appears in Calypso and subsequently appears or is mentioned in every episode.
Bloom, Marcus.
A dentist, unrelated to Leopold Bloom. Mr. Farrell passes his office in Wandering Rocks, and he is mentioned in Cyclops and Circe.
Bloom, Marion (Molly, née Tweedy).
Molly is one of the three central characters of Ulysses. She is married to Leopold Bloom, and has two children, 15-year-old Milly, who lives in Mullingar and works as a photographer's assistant, and Rudy, who died eleven days after he was born a little over ten years before Ulysses. Molly, who is half-Jewish, was born in Gibraltar and spent her early years there. She is a professional singer, and is in the planning stages of a concert tour organized by Hugh (Blazes) Boylan. She begins an affair with Boylan on June 16, 1904. She appears in Calypso, Circe, and Ithaca, and Bloom thinks of her constantly throughout the day. The final episode, Penelope, is written entirely in Molly's voice.
Bloom, Millicent (Milly).
Daughter of Leopold and Molly Bloom. On June 16, 1904, she has just celebrated her fifteenth birthday. She is living in Mullingar and working in a photographer's shop. Milly is seeing a young medical student named Alec Bannon, who is a friend of Buck Mulligan. In Calypso, the Blooms each receive correspondence from her-- a letter for Bloom thanking him for the birthday gift, and a postcard for Molly. Bloom and Molly think of her often, but her only appearance is a brief hallucinatory one in Circe.
Bloom, Rudolph (né Rudolf Virag).
Leopold Bloom's father, who changed the Hungarian family name Virag to Bloom ("virag" is the Hungarian word for "flower"). He was the proprietor of the Queen's Hotel in Ennis, where he killed himself in 1888. Bloom thinks of his father many times during the day (usually as "poor papa"). He also thinks about his planned trip to Ennis later in the month to mark the anniversary of his father's death. In Circe, the senior Bloom is one of many deceased characters who appear in the hallucinatory environment of Nighttown.
Bloom, Rudolph (Rudy).
Son of Leopold and Molly Bloom. Rudy died ten and a half years before the events of Ulysses when he was eleven days old. Bloom thinks of him often, and his longing for his lost son is a large part of what draws him to Stephen Dedalus. Rudy appears in a hallucination at the end of Circe at the age he would have been if he had lived. Molly knitted a white woolen vest or jacket for his burial, mentioned in Oxen of the Sun and Penelope, and possibly alluded to in Circe when "a white lambkin peeps out of [Rudy's] waistcoat pocket." Both Bloom (in Lestrygonians) and Molly (in Penelope) state that intimacy between them hasn't been the same since Rudy's death.
Boardman, Edy.
A friend of Gerty MacDowell's. In Nausicaa, Edy, Gerty and their friend Cissy Caffrey are relaxing on the beach. Edy has with her a baby referred to as Baby Boardman. Since Cissy is there with her younger brothers, the baby is usually assumed to be Edy's sibling, but the relationship between them is not defined. Edy also appears briefly in Circe. (Baby Boardman appears separately, later in Circe.)
Boylan, Hugh (Blazes).
A successful, well-known Dublin businessman with a variety of interests. Boylan is also a singer and sometime manager of Molly Bloom's musical career. He and Molly begin an affair on June 16, 1904. In Sirens, the jingling of Boylan's car becomes a metonymy for Boylan himself. He is spotted by the men in the funeral carriage in Hades, and also appears in Lestrygonians, Wandering Rocks, Sirens, and Circe; he is mentioned in Calypso, Cyclops, Nausicaa, Eumaeus, Ithaca, and Penelope.
Breen, Denis.
Husband of the former Josie Powell. He is the recipient of a post card with only the inscription "U.P." His obsessive reaction to it leads to questions about his mental balance. He appears in Lestrygonians, Wandering Rocks, Cyclops, and Circe.
Breen, Josie (née Powell).
Wife of Denis Breen. A longtime friend of Molly Bloom's who was dating Leopold Bloom when he met Molly. She appears in Lestrygonians, Wandering Rocks, Cyclops, and Circe. She is mentioned in Nausicaa, Ithaca, and Penelope.
Burke, Andrew (Pisser).
Friend of the Narrator of Cyclops. Burke the Blooms when they lived at the City Arms Hotel. He is mentioned in Cyclops, Ithaca and Penelope, and appears briefly (twice) in Circe.
Burke, O'Madden.
See O'Madden Burke, Mr.
Bushe, Seymour.
Real-life Dublin lawyer mentioned in Hades, Aeolus, Oxen of the Sun, and Ithaca, and also appears in Circe. Bushe was well-known for having defended Samuel Childs in 1899 against the charge of murdering his brother (the famous "Childs murder case" discussed in Aeolus and Oxen of the Sun). Ellmann records that Joyce attended at least some of the Childs trial, and recorded in his Pola notebook a phrase similar to the one J. J. O'Molloy quotes in Aeolus.
Byrne, David (Davy).
Owner of Davy Byrne's, the pub where Bloom eats a cheese sandwich in Lestrygonians. Byrne also appears briefly (twice) in Circe. The pub is mentioned in Sirens and Ithaca, and also in the Dubliners story "Counterparts" ("Nosey Flynn was sitting up in his usual corner of Davy Byrne's").   D
Caffrey, Cissy.
Companion of Gerty MacDowell and Edy Boardman in Nausicaa, where Cissy is watching her two younger brothers play along the strand. She appears in the company of Private Carr at the beginning and end of Circe, but it is unclear what she could be doing in Nighttown.
Caffrey, Jacky. Caffrey, Tommy.
Younger brothers of Cissy Caffrey. Appear in Nausicaa and Circe.
Callan, Nurse.
Nurse at the Holles Street Maternity Hospital, where much of the action of Oxen of the Sun takes place. It is Nurse Callan who brings the news that Mrs. Purefoy has finally had her baby. When the drunken students run out of alcohol and rush out to relocate to Burke's pub, Leopold Bloom stops to speak to Nurse Callan and ask her to send a kind word to the new mother. In a typically clumsy attempt to speak kindly to Nurse Callan, Bloom then asks, "Madam, when comes the storkbird for thee?" before he follows the students out into the night.
Callinan, Christopher.
Brother-in-law of journalist Ignatius Gallaher. In Wandering Rocks, Lenehan recalls a carriage ride in which Leopold Bloom and Chris Callinan sat on one side and he and Molly Bloom sat on the other. Bloom pointed out "all the stars and the comets" to Callinan while Lenehan enjoyed having Molly bump up against him every time the carriage jolted. Callinan is also mentioned in Aeolus, and appears briefly in Circe.
Carr, Private.
One of two British soldiers who appear at the beginning and end of Circe. According to Ellmann, Joyce named him after Henry Carr, a British employee at the consulate in Zurich with whom he had a legal wrangle, intending it as an insult. See also Compton, Private.
The Citizen.
An unnamed Irish patriot who seems to be a frequent patron of Barney Kiernan's, the bar where most of Cyclops takes place. He is accompanied by the dog Garryowen, although the dog is owned by Gerty MacDowell's grandfather Giltrap. The Citizen also appears in Circe, and he is mentioned in Eumaeus and Ithaca. Joyce modeled him on the real-life Michael Cusack, founder of the Gaelic Athletic Association, an organization dedicated to the revival of traditional Irish sports. He seems to represent the old-time Irish Nationalist's harsh, single-minded obsession with British occupation, ignoring all of Ireland's other problems, which were only too apparent to Joyce.
Citron, J.
Former neighbor of the Blooms. Leopold Bloom thinks of him in Calypso, Aeolus, and Lestrygonians, and he appears three times in Circe. Molly Bloom thinks of him and his wife ("the Citrons") in Penelope. Gifford notes that Joyce probably took his name from Thom's, a Dublin directory, where the "J." was most likely a misprint for Israel Citron, who lived in St Kevin's Parade in 1904.
Clifford, Martha.
Leopold Bloom (using the alias Henry Flower) maintains a secret correspondence with Martha that frequently involves sexual innuendo, but they have never met. Their correspondence began after Martha responded to an ad Bloom placed for a "smart lady typist." Bloom receives a letter from her in Lotus Eaters which contains several grammatical and typographical errors. Phrases from the letter pop up in Bloom's thoughts throughout the day. "Martha Clifford" may not be her real name.
Coffey, Father.
The priest at Paddy Dignam's funeral. Mentioned in Sirens, appears in Hades and Circe.
Cohen, Bella.
Owner of the brothel where most of the action of Circe takes place. When she transforms into a masculinized power figure in Leopold Bloom's nightmarish imaginings, she becomes "he" and is referred to as Bello. Bloom also thinks of her briefly in Ithaca when he lists the events of the day.
Compton, Private.
One of two British soldiers who appear at the beginning and end of Circe. See also Carr, Private.
Conmee, Father John.
Jesuit priest, rector of Clongowes Wood College, which Stephen Dedalus attended as a boy. Stephen remembers him briefly in Scylla & Charybdis; he also appears in Wandering Rocks and Circe. Conmee also appears in A Portrait of the Artist. In real life, Father Conmee helped Joyce and his brother Stanislaus get scholarships at Belvedere College; his kind consideration is reflected in his fictional counterpart's concern for Dignam's widow and children.   P
Conroy, Gabriel.
Gabriel is the protagonist of "The Dead," the most famous of the stories in Dubliners. He is referred to only casually in Ulysses (in Aeolus, Bloom remembers that J. J. O'Molloy does "some literary work for the Express with Gabriel Conroy"), but his importance in "The Dead" makes the brief reference of interest. Married to Gretta Conroy. D
Conroy, Gretta.
Wife of Gabriel Conroy. She is a major character in the short story "The Dead" in Dubliners. She does not appear in Ulysses, but she must be someone the Blooms know since Bloom remembers that Molly once asked "What had Gretta Conroy on?" in Calypso. D
Conroy, Father.
One of three priests performing mass at a seaside church during Nausicaa (see also Hughes, John and O'Hanlon, Canon). Father Conroy also has a brief non-speaking appearance in Circe, and is mentioned as Paddy Dignam's confessor in Wandering Rocks.
Corley, "Lord" John.
An acquaintance of Stephen Dedalus. Ellmann reports that "in fact and fiction," Corley was a policeman's son, so the honorific is a nickname only. Corley is broke and attempts (successfully) to get Stephen to loan him money in Eumaeus. He also appears in the story "The Two Gallants" in Dubliners, where he was previously involved in another unsavory scheme for "borrowing" money. In "The Two Gallants," Joyce says that Corley pronounces his name with an aspirated initial consonant "after the manner of the Florentines," leaving unsaid that this would sound (appropriately enough) like "whorely." D
Costello, Francis ("Punch").
One of the medical students in Oxen of the Sun. He reappears briefly as a hobgoblin in Circe.
Cowley, Father Bob.
Priest whose financial woes play a major part in section 14 of Wandering Rocks. Gifford notes that he is a "spoiled priest": he is not defrocked, but he has drifted away from vows and duties (5.180). He is also appears in Sirens and is mentioned in Lotus-Eaters and Circe.
Cranly.
Cranly was once Stephen Dedalus's closest friend. Their break is a major part of the fifth section of A Portrait of the Artist. Cranly does not appear in Ulysses, but Stephen thinks of him in Telemachus, Nestor, Proteus, and Scylla & Charybdis. Cranly was modeled on Joyce's real life friend John Francis Byrne.     P
Crawford, Myles.
Editor of The Evening Telegraph, a Dublin newspaper. He appears in Aeolus and Circe, and is mentioned in Nausicaa, Cyclops, Oxen of the Sun, and Eumaeus.
Crofton.
A real-life associate of Joyce's father (the fictional Simon Dedalus). He is mentioned in Hades and appears in Cyclops and also in the Dubliners story "Ivy Day in the Committee Room."  D
Crotthers.
One of the medical students in Oxen of the Sun, also appears in Circe. Crotthers is from Scotland.
Cuffe, Joe.
A cattle dealer whose business was located near the Dublin Cattle Market on the North Circular Road. Cuffe is a former employer of Leopold Bloom's.
Cunningham, Martin.
Cunningham rides in a carriage with Leopold Bloom, Jack Power, and Simon Dedalus as part of Paddy Dignam's funeral procession. Cunningham represents Dubliners at their best when he shows sensitivity about Bloom's father's suicide, yet just a few pages earlier he has "thwarted [Bloom's] speech rudely." He is the prime mover behind an effort to gather funds for Dignam's family to "keep them going till the insurance is cleared up." (Bloom contributes without a second thought.) Cunningham also appears in Dubliners in the short story "Grace," where he encourages Protestant Tom Kernan to go on a Catholic retreat as part of a plan to reform his alcoholism. Cunningham is mentioned in Lotus Eaters, Aeolus, Eumaeus, Ithaca, and Penelope; he appears in Hades, Wandering Rocks, Cyclops, and Circe.   D
The Dairy Woman.
In Telemachus, Buck Mulligan complains that the milk delivery is late. A few minutes later, the old woman who brings their milk arrives. Haines, a student of Irish folklore, sees her as a perfect example of agrarian Old Ireland, but when he speaks Irish to her, she thinks it is French.
Dandrade, Mrs. Miriam.
In Lestrygonians, Mrs. Dandrade is described as a divorced Spanish American who sold the Blooms her used undergarments while they were running a used clothing business. The information is used to make salacious accusations against Leopold Bloom in Circe. She also appears briefly in Circe as part of the crowd chasing Bloom when he leaves the brothel.
d'Arcy, Bartell.
A tenor with whom Molly Bloom has worked. They shared a memorable kiss after a performance, which Molly describes in Penelope. He is mentioned in Lestrygonians, Wandering Rocks, Circe, and Ithaca. d'Arcy also appears in "The Dead" in Dubliners, where he causes Gabriel Conroy a moment of jealousy because of his attentions to Conroy's wife Gretta.   D
Dawson, Dan.
Gives a speech about Ireland that is full of purple prose. It is printed in a newspaper the day of Ulysses, and mocked by the men at the newspaper office in Aeolus. He is also mentioned in Wandering Rocks, and appears briefly in Circe.
de Kock, Paul.
Author of the steamy novels that Molly Bloom likes to read.
Deasy, Garrett.
Headmaster at the school where Stephen Dedalus teaches. He gives Stephen unwelcome advice in Nestor, and also hands him a letter about foot and mouth disease, hoping that Stephen will pass it to the newspaper editors he knows to be published. In Aeolus, Myles Crawford describes Deasy as a "grass widower," a man separated (but not divorced) from his wife. Deasy is mentioned in Proteus, Aeolus and Eumaeus; appears in Nestor and Circe.  
Dedalus, Boody. Dedalus, Katey. Dedalus, Maggie.
Stephen Dedalus's sisters, who live in poverty with their neglectful father, Simon Dedalus, after the death of their mother. They appear briefly but memorably in Wandering Rocks, and Stephen thinks of them in Eumaeus. Molly remembers seeing "2 Dedalus girls" in Penelope. They also appear in Portrait of the Artist. See also Dilly Dedalus. P
Dedalus, Delia (Dilly).
Stephen Dedalus's sister, who lives with her sisters and her father, Simon Dedalus, after the death of her mother. She appears more frequently in Ulysses than the rest of the sisters. In Wandering Rocks, Stephen runs into her just after she has purchased a French lesson book. He sympathizes with her desire to rise above her situation, but believes that he can't help her without dragging himself down. She also appears in Portrait of the Artist. See also Dedalus, Boody. Dedalus, Katey. Dedalus, Maggie. P
Dedalus, Mary (May, née Goulding).
Stephen Dedalus's mother, sister of Richie Goulding. She dies between the end of A Portrait of the Artist and the beginning of Ulysses. Stephen refuses her dying request to pray at her bedside, a decision which he does not regret but that makes him uneasy. She is associated with the smell of wetted ashes.  P
Dedalus, Simon.
Stephen Dedalus's father, modeled on Joyce's father, John Joyce. Simon Dedalus has a great sense of humor and a much-admired singing voice, but his drinking has steadily, over a long period of time, destroyed the family's finances. His children have been neglected since his wife May died. He appears in Hades, Aeolus, Wandering Rocks, Sirens, and Circe; mentioned in Telemachus, Proteus, Calypso, Lestrygonians, Scylla & Charybdis, Nausicaa, Oxen of the Sun, Eumaeus, Ithaca, and Penelope.   P
Dedalus, Stephen.
One of the three major characters of Ulysses. Stephen is a well-read, intensely intellectual writer and poet. The story of his early life is told in A Portrait of the Artist, a thinly veiled autobiographical account of Joyce's childhood and student years. At the close of the events in Portrait, Stephen heads off to Paris to pursue a career as a writer, but he is called back when his mother is on her deathbed. Stephen has renounced Catholicism and much of his loyalty to his family and Ireland in favor of pursuing his art.  P
Dignam, Patrick (Paddy).
Dubliner whose funeral takes place during the morning of June 16, 1904. News of his unexpected death and concern for his widow and children thread in and out of conversations throughout the day.
Dignam, Master Patrick (Patsy).
Paddy Dignam's oldest son. He attends the funeral in Hades, appears in Wandering Rocks and Circe, and is mentioned in Cyclops, Nausicaa, and Ithaca.
Dillon, Floey. Dillon, Atty. Dillon, Tiny.
Children of Mat Dillon and longtime friends of Molly Bloom's.
Dillon, Matthew (Mat).
Friend of Leopold Bloom's and of Brian Tweedy, Molly Bloom's father. The Blooms met at his house in Terenure, a suburb south of Dublin. Both Bloom and Molly remember meeting Stephen Dedalus at Dillon's house when Stephen was five years old. He is mentioned in Hades, Sirens, Nausicaa, Circe, and Penelope. He is also included in Ithaca in Bloom's "series" of men who have been interested in Molly.
Dillon, Valentine Blake (Val).
Former Lord Mayor of Dublin, brother of Mat Dillon. He is mentioned in Lestrygonians, Wandering Rocks, Nausicaa, and Circe. In Ithaca, he is included in Bloom's "series" of men who have been interested in Molly. Molly remembers him in Penelope.
Dixon.
One of the medical students in Oxen of the Sun. He treated Bloom for a bee sting a few weeks before June 16, which Bloom thinks of in Hades and Lestrygonians. He also appears in Circe.
Dlugacz, Moses.
A pork butcher in Bloom's neighborhood, a somewhat unusual occupation for a Jewish man. He appears in Calypso and Circe, and "Dlugacz' porkshop" is mentioned in Sirens.
Dodd, Reuben J.
A real-life Dublin solicitor (not Jewish) who is portrayed as a Jewish moneylender in Ulysses. Bloom endures several incidents of thinly veiled anti-Semitism throughout the day; the anti-Semitism directed at Reuben J. Dodd is not veiled at all. Ellmann reports that Joyce's father was heavily in debt to the real-life Dodd, possibly explaining Simon Dedalus's savage reaction to the fictional Dodd in Hades. Dodd also appears in Circe; he is mentioned in Lestrygonians, Wandering Rocks, Sirens, and Cyclops.
Dolan, Father.
One of the priests at Stephen's former school, Clongowes Wood College. In Portrait of the Artist, Stephen had been excused from studying because his glasses were broken. Father Dolan, seeing him idle, lashes his hands with a pandybat. The accusing words Father Dolan directs at him on that occasion are recalled by Stephen in Aeolus ("See it in your face. See it in your eye. Lazy idle little schemer.") He also appears in Circe.  P
Dollard, Ben.
A large singer with a bass voice, famous for his rendition of "The Croppy Boy." Dollard was formerly a successful ships' chandler, but the business has failed and he now lives in Iveagh House, a charity lodging-house for men. Both Bloom and Molly remember the night they loaned him pants for a concert. The incident amused Molly because the pants were quite tight. Dollard appears in Wandering Rocks, Sirens, and Circe and is mentioned in Hades, Lestrygonians, and Penelope. He is also on Bloom's list of Molly's past admirers in Ithaca.
Doran, Bob.
In Ulysses, Bob Doran is out on his annual bender. He appears drunk and barely able to stand in Cyclops. The history behind his need for an annual bender is told in the Dubliners story "The Boarding House," where he is the quasi-victim of a manipulative mother and daughter, resulting in his marriage to Polly Mooney. Doran is mentioned in Lotus Eaters; he appears in Lestrygonians, Wandering Rocks, Cyclops, and Circe.   D
Doran, Mrs. (née Polly Mooney).
Bob Doran's wife. She is barely mentioned in Ulysses, but she is a major character in the Dubliners story "The Boarding House," where she is encouraged by her mother to seek a husband among the boarders.   D
Douce, Lydia.
One of two barmaids who are central characters in Sirens (see also Kennedy, Mina). Miss Douce is referred to as "bronze" because of the color of her hair; Miss Kennedy is "gold." Miss Douce is also mentioned in Wandering Rocks and plays a part in Circe.
Dowie, Alexander J.
A real-life American evangelist. Although Dowie did travel to Europe, Gifford notes that he was not in Ireland in 1904 (157). Dowie saw himself as the embodiment of Elijah, the Old Testament prophet whose reappearance was supposed to signal the second coming of the Messiah. Dowie is mentioned in Lestrygonians, Oxen of the Sun, and Ithaca. In the hallucinatory environment of Circe, he appears as both himself and Elijah.
Doyle, Henry.
Longtime friend of the Blooms. In Penelope, Molly thinks of "that other fool Henry Doyle." He is included in Bloom's memory of playing charades at Luke Doyle's house in Nausicaa, but the relationship between him and Luke is not specified.
Doyle, Luke.
Longtime friend of the Blooms, particularly memorable for a game of charades played at his house in Dolphin's Barn, a suburb of Dublin. Bloom thinks of that evening in Lestrygonians, Nausicaa, and Ithaca. Both Molly and Josie Powell (now Josie Breen) were there, as well as Mat Dillon and his "bevy of daughters."
Dudley, Earl of (William Humble Ward).
Dudley was the real-life British Viceroy and Lord Lieutenant of Ireland from 1902 to 1906. At the end of Lestrygonians, Bloom remembers that the Dudleys are scheduled to attend a bazaar later in the day to raise funds for Mercer's Hospital. The viceregal cavalcade which winds its way through Dublin in Wandering Rocks is Lord and Lady Dudley and their party on their way to the bazaar. Dudley is also mentioned in Sirens, Cyclops, and Circe. In addition, Lady Dudley is mentioned in Aeolus.
Dunne, Miss.
Hugh (Blazes) Boylan's secretary. She appears only in Wandering Rocks, but she is particularly memorable for confirming the exact date (16 June 1904) as she types a letter. She may also be "the girl in the office" John Corley mentions to Stephen Dedalus in Eumaeus.
Egan, Kevin.
One of the "wild geese," Irish ex-patriots living in Europe rather than live in Ireland under British rule. Egan is based on Joseph Casey, a real-life Fenian (revolutionaries who wanted the British out of Ireland). Casey and another Fenian leader were the object of a botched rescue attempt while they were incarcerated in London in Clerkenwell prison (Casey, for his alleged involvement in a previous rescue of two Fenian leaders that resulted in the death of a police sergeant). The Clerkenwell prison incident caused the deaths of 12 Londoners and injured many more (Gifford 52, 56). Stephen Dedalus visited Egan while he was in Paris, a scene he recalls in Proteus. The Citizen mentions him in Cyclops. Egan also makes a brief appearance in Circe.    
Egan, Patrice.
Kevin Egan's son.
Eglinton, John.
Pseudonym of Magee, William.
Falkiner, Sir Frederick.
The Recorder of Dublin. Gifford describes the position as "the chief judicial officer of Dublin." The real-life Falkiner was Recorder from 1876 to 1905. He is mentioned in Aeolus, Cyclops, and appears briefly in Lestrygonians and Circe.
Fanning, John (Long John).
Subsheriff of Dublin, modeled on Long John Clancy, a real life subsheriff of Dublin. He is often referred to as long John ("When is long John going to hang that fellow in Mountjoy?" in Cyclops) or even simply the long fellow ("Alf Bergan will speak to the long fellow," in Sirens). He appears in Wandering Rocks and Circe, and is mentioned in Aeolus, Sirens, Cyclops, and Nausicaa. He is also referred to in two stories in Dubliners, "Ivy Day in the Committee Room" and "Grace."   D
Farrell, Cashel Boyle O'Connor Fitzmaurice Tisdall.
Colorful real-life Dublin eccentric often seen about town. He is sighted and/or mentioned in in Lestrygonians, Scylla & Charybdis, Wandering Rocks, Sirens, and Circe.
Fitzharris, James (Skin-the-Goat).
A real-life character suspected of participating in the Phoenix Park murders by driving a decoy car. His alleged role in the famous murder case is discussed in Aeolus. Two times--in Aeolus and Eumaeus--characters mention that the keeper of the cabman's shelter in Eumaeus is suspected to be Fitzharris, but the information is never verified.
Fleming, Mrs.
The Blooms' domestic help, whom Molly thinks is not much help. She is mentioned in Hades, Ithaca, and Penelope.
Flynn, Nosey.
Yet another Dubliner who seems to mainly hang out in bars. In the Dubliners story "Counterparts," he is sitting "in his usual corner at Davy Byrne's [pub]." When Bloom enters Davy Byrne's in Lestrygonians, Flynn greets him "from his nook." He also appears in Wandering Rocks and Circe, and is mentioned in Cyclops and Nausicaa.   D
Flower, Henry.
Pseudonym used by Bloom in his correspondence with Martha Clifford.
Fogarty.
A grocer who is mentioned in Hades and in the Dubliners story "Grace." Tom Kernan owes him money.   D
Gallaher, Ignatius.
Journalist praised by Myles Crawford in Aeolus for his inventive (and possibly illegal) method of giving a New York newspaper information about the Phoenix Park murders. To get around British laws about reporting on crimes that have yet to come to trial, Gallaher used points on an unrelated newspaper page to describe a map of the area of the murder. He also appears in the Dubliners story "A Little Cloud" as a successful journalist who has moved to London. Brother-in-law of Chris Callinan.  D
Gardner, Lieutenant Stanley G.
British officer killed by enteric fever in South Africa. He was a love interest of Molly Bloom's, apparently unknown to Leopold Bloom since he is not included in Bloom's "series" of men who were interested in Molly. Gardner is mentioned only in Penelope.
Garryowen.
Dog owned by Gerty MacDowell's grandfather Giltrap, and cared for by the Citizen. His name comes from a patriotic Irish song. Garryowen appears in Cyclops and Circe, and is mentioned in Nausicaa.
Gilligan, Philip.
One of three childhood friends of Bloom's who douse him under a pump, which Bloom lists as one of his three baptisms in Ithaca. Later in Ithaca, Gilligan is listed as one of Bloom's deceased friends. He is also mentioned in Lestrygonians.
Glynn, Joseph.
An organist, mentioned in Lotus Eaters, Sirens, and Circe.
Goldberg, Owen.
Childhood friend of Leopold Bloom's. Bloom remembers climbing trees with Goldberg and Percy Apjohn in Lestrygonians. Both Apjohn and Goldberg appear with several other friends as "The Halcyon Days" in Circe. He is also mentioned in Ithaca.
Goodwin, Professor.
Elderly pianist and music teacher who has been Molly's accompanist. He never actually appears except in the hallucinations of Circe, but he is mentioned surprisingly often, in Calypso, Lestrygonians, Sirens, Ithaca, and three times in Penelope.
Goulding, Richie.
Stephen Dedalus's uncle on his mother's side. There is no love lost between Richie Goulding and his brother-in-law Simon Dedalus—in Hades, Simon speaks of him as the "drunken little cost-drawer." Stephen vividly imagines visiting the Gouldings in Proteus as he walks along the strand, but goes past the turnoff without noticing until it is too late. Bloom shares a meal with him in Sirens. He also appears in Wandering Rocks and Circe, and is mentioned in Hades, Lestrygonians, and Nausicaa.
Goulding, Sara.
Stephen Dedalus's aunt, Richie Goulding's wife.
Goulding, Walter.
Stephen's cousin, son of Richie and Sara Goulding.
Haines.
British student of Irish folklore who lives with Stephen Dedalus and Buck Mulligan in the Martello tower at Sandycove when Ulysses opens. The Martello tower episode is based on the brief, real-life time that Joyce spent there with Oliver St. John Gogarty (who became Buck Mulligan) and Samuel Chenevix Trench (who became Haines). Gogarty met Trench while he was a student at Oxford. Trench was a dedicated student of Irish literature and folklore; he was especially interested in resurrecting the Irish language. Haines appears in Telemachus, Wandering Rocks, and Oxen of the Sun.
Higgins, Zoe.
One of the prostitutes in Circe. She takes Leopold Bloom's potato from him, but gives it back when he asks for it. Higgins is also Bloom's mother's maiden name, but they are unrelated.
Holohan, Hoppy.
One of several Dubliners who seem mainly to hang out in bars. He is also one of the main characters in "A Mother" in Dubliners, where he is the ineffective organizer of a series of concerts. D
Hooper, John.
Real-life Dublin politician who held the position of Alderman. Father of Paddy Hooper. He is mentioned in Hades, and in Ithaca we learn that he gave the Blooms a stuffed owl as a wedding present, which still sits on their mantelpiece. He is also included in Bloom's series of Molly's admirers.
Hooper, Paddy.
Journalist for the Freeman's Journal. He is mentioned twice in Aeolus.
Hornblower.
Porter at the gate of Trinity College. He appears in Lotus Eaters, Wandering Rocks, Circe (three times), and is mentioned in Penelope.
Horne, Dr.
Attending physician at the National Maternity Hospital. He is mentioned in Lestrygonians and Oxen of the Sun.
Hughes, John S. J.
One of three priests performing mass at a seaside church during Nausicaa (see also Conroy, Father and O'Hanlon, Canon). He also appears briefly in Circe.
Hynes, Joe.
A journalist who attends Paddy Dignam's funeral and submits a brief writeup to The Evening Telegraph, including a list of those in attendance. He owes Bloom three shillings, which he neglects to pay even after Bloom not-so-subtly reminds him in Aeolus. He is either mentioned or appears in nearly every episode after Hades, most notably in Cyclops. Hynes also appears in "Ivy Day in the Committee Room," a story in Dubliners.   D
Johnson, Georgina.
Stephen Dedalus's favorite prostitute. When Stephen considers his expenses in Scylla & Charybdis, he reflects briefly that much of his money has been spent in Georgina Johnson's bed. When he arrives at Nighttown in Circe, Stephen discovers that Georgina has married a Mr. Lambe of London and moved away ("Lamb of London," thinks Stephen, "who takest away the sins of our world.")
Kearney, Kathleen.
A younger singer and pianist Molly Bloom thinks of in Penelope. In the Dubliners story "A Mother," she is a daughter whose mother carefully and obsessively arranges her participation in a concert of Irish music put on by Hoppy Holohan.   D
Kearns, Anne.
One of the two fictional "Dublin vestals" in the story Stephen Dedalus tells in Aeolus (for the other, see MacCabe, Florence). She may also be, by implication, the midwife accompanying the "real" Florence MacCabe on the strand in Proteus, but she is unnamed there. It is possible that Stephen made up the name.
Kelleher, Cornelius T. (Corny).
Works as assistant to H.J. O’Neill, the undertaker who handles Paddy Dignam's funeral. Leopold Bloom wonders if Corny is a police informant in Lestrygonians, and this suspicion seems to be confirmed in Wandering Rocks. He is also mentioned in Lotus Eaters and Eumaeus, and appears in Hades, Cyclops, and Circe.
Kelly, Bridie.
A prostitute, Leopold Bloom's first sexual encounter. Bloom thinks of her in Oxen of the Sun, and she appears briefly in Circe.
Kennedy, Mina.
One of the two barmaids who are central to the events of Sirens (see also Douce, Lydia.). Miss Kennedy is referred to as "gold" because of the color of her hair; while Miss Douce is "bronze." Miss Kennedy is also mentioned in Wandering Rocks and plays a part in Circe.
Keogh, Myler.
A boxer. His match with sergeantmajor Bennett is discussed in Lestrygonians, Wandering Rocks, and Cyclops. Keogh is Irish ("Dublin's pet lamb") and Bennett is British, adding a nationalistic fervor to discussions of their match.
Kernan, Thomas (Tom).
In the Dubliners story "Grace," Protestant Tom Kernan is a drunk whose Catholic friends talk him into going to a Catholic retreat to help him turn over a new leaf. The intervention seems to have had little effect, since Kernan orders a gin in Wandering Rocks and seems to fully participate in the drinking going on in Sirens. He is one of the mourners at Paddy Dignam's funeral in Hades, appears as one of the members of Bloom's jury in Circe, and is mentioned in his occupation as a tea merchant in Lotus Eaters, Lestrygonians, Eumaeus, Ithaca, and Penelope.   D
Keyes, Alexander.
One of Leopold Bloom's clients, a merchant of groceries, tea and wine. Bloom tries to negotiate the sale of advertising space to Keyes in Lotus Eaters and Aeolus, and the idea of the ad crops up throughout the rest of the day.
Lambert, Edward J. (Ned).
One of the mourners at Paddy Dignam's funeral and a friend of Simon Dedalus. Gifford identifies him as a worker in a seed and grain store located in St. Mary's Abbey in Dublin. A seed merchant took over the abbey chapterhouse after most of the rest of the abbey was destroyed by a fire at the end of the nineteenth century. In the eighth section of Wandering Rocks, Lambert is giving a tour of the Abbey ruins, picking his way around sacks of grain. He also appears in Hades, Aeolus, Cyclops, and Circe, and is mentioned in Sirens, Eumaeus, and Ithaca.
Laredo, Lunita.
Molly Bloom's mother. She is mentioned only by Molly in Penelope. It appears that Molly knows little about her except her name ("my mother whoever she was").
Lenehan.
Appears off and on throughout the day, particularly when there is horse-racing involved. Lenehan, an unemployed leech, is Blazes Boylan's sidekick in Sirens, and also Lord John Corley's sidekick in the Dubliners story "The Two Gallants."   D
Leonard, Paddy.
Often shows up in bar scenes. Leonard is mentioned in Hades and Cyclops, and appears in Lestrygonians and Circe. He is also a character in the Dubliners story "Counterparts."    D
Love, Reverend Hugh C.
Anglican cleric who lives in Sallins, a small town southwest of Dublin. Love is being given a tour of St. Mary's Abbey by Ned Lambert in Wandering Rocks. He is Father Cowley's landlord. Cowley owes him several months rent, and Love is trying to have him evicted. He is also mentioned in Sirens and Circe.
Lynch, Vincent.
A friend of Stephen Dedalus from his university days, modeled on a real-life friend of Joyce, Vincent Cosgrave. Cosgrave was interested in Joyce's wife Nora at the time when they were dating; perhaps in consequence, Lynch is compared to Judas in Circe. Lynch accompanies Stephen to Mrs. Cohen's brothel in Circe, and allows Stephen to pay his share. But he deserts Stephen when Private Carr threatens violent action. Lynch appears in Wandering Rocks, Oxen of the Sun, and Circe, and is mentioned in Eumaeus. He is also a character in Portrait of the Artist.   P
Lyons, Frederick M. (Bantam).
Another Dublin character that spends plenty of time in pubs. Lyons meets Bloom early in the day, and mistakenly believes that Bloom has given him a tip on a horse race. He does not follow this supposed tip, but the recommended horse Throwaway goes on to win the race. By the time of the Cyclops episode, word has spread (incorrectly) that Bloom made a great deal of money on the race, and Bloom's perceived stinginess in not volunteering to buy a round for the house causes trouble. Lyons appears in Lotus Eaters, Lestrygonians, and he appears to have joined the revelers at the end of Oxen of the Sun; he is mentioned in Wandering Rocks, Cyclops, and Circe. He also appears in "Ivy Day in the Committee Room" in Dubliners.   D
Lyster, Thomas William.
One of the librarians at the National Library. Gifford identifies him as the "Quaker librarian" in the first line of Scylla & Charybdis. He also appears in Circe.
MacCabe, Florence.
One of the midwives Stephen Dedalus sees on the beach in Proteus. She is also one of the fictional "Dublin vestals" in Stephen's Parable of the Plums in Aeolus. She appears briefly in Wandering Rocks and is mentioned in Circe. See also Anne Kearns.
MacDowell, Gertrude (Gerty).
The object of Leopold Bloom's lust in Nausicaa. Gerty's character and much of the style of the first half of Nausicaa are taken from a sentimental 1854 novel, The Lamplighter, by Maria Cummins. Gerty's appearance is presaged in Sirens and Cyclops, and she is mentioned briefly in Circe and Ithaca.
MacHugh, Professor Hugh.
Participant in the literary discussion in Aeolus, but his field of expertise is not specified. He is also mentioned in Sirens and Circe.
Madden, William.
One of the medical students in Oxen of the Sun, also appears briefly (twice) in Circe.
Magee, William K.
A real-life librarian at the National Library, and a prominent member of the Dublin literary scene. He sometimes used the pseudonym John Eglinton (in real life and in Ulysses). He appears under both names in Scylla & Charybdis and as Eglinton in Circe.
Maginni, Denis J.
A real-life, well-known Dublin dancing teacher. He is mentioned in Lestrygonians, and appears in Wandering Rocks and Circe.
Man in the Macintosh (M’Intosh).
One of the more intriguing mysteries of Ulysses. The man in the macintosh first appears as the thirteenth mourner at Paddy Dignam's funeral, but no one seems to know who he is. Joe Hynes misunderstands Leopold Bloom and assumes that his name is "M’Intosh," although his name and identity are never established. The man in the macintosh appears or is mentioned at various times throughout the rest of the day, including Wandering Rocks, Nausicaa, Oxen of the Sun, Circe, Eumaeus, and Ithaca. Lipoti Virag wears a brown macintosh in Circe, but it is unclear whether he has anything to do with M’Intosh. In the 1921 edition, two spellings are used, both "macintosh" and "mackintosh."
Mastiansky, Julius.
A long-time Jewish friend and former neighbor of the Blooms. He is mentioned in Calypso, Hades, and Ithaca, and appears in Circe. Molly Bloom mentions his wife and his preferred method of love-making in Penelope.
M’Coy, C. P.
Married to Fanny, who has a singing career similar to Molly Bloom but less successful. M'Coy has in the past borrowed valises from his friends for her tours, which he then neglects to return. M’Coy does not attend Paddy Dignam's funeral, but at his request, Bloom puts M'Coy's name down as if he were there, so he appears in subsequent lists of the attendees. He is mentioned in Calypso, Hades, Lestrygonians, Sirens, Nausicaa, Eumaeus, and Penelope; he appears in Lotus Eaters, Wandering Rocks, and Circe. M'Coy and his valise scam also appear in the Dubliners story "Grace."   D
M’Coy, Fanny
Wife of C. P. M’Coy, friend and rival of Molly Bloom's. Bloom thinks she is considerably less talented than Molly, and others seem to agree. She is mentioned in Lotus Eaters, Wandering Rocks, Sirens, Nausicaa, Eumaeus, and Penelope.
Menton, John Henry.
A solicitor (lawyer) based on a real-life person of the same name. In Ulysses, he is also Paddy Dignam's former boss. He is one of the mourners at Dignam's funeral and puts his name down "for a quid" for the fund Martin Cunningham is raising for the Dignam family. In Hades, both Menton and Leopold Bloom think of a memorable game of bowls in which Bloom came out on top. After the funeral, Leopold Bloom points out to Menton that his hat is slightly dented, which irritates Menton. The incident recurs in Bloom's mind several times throughout the day. Menton appears in Hades, Wandering Rocks, and Circe; he is mentioned in Lestrygonians, Cyclops, Eumaeus, Ithaca and Penelope.
Mesias, George S.
Leopold Bloom's tailor. He is mentioned in Hades, Sirens, Circe, and Ithaca.
Moisel, Philip and Mrs. Moisel.
Jewish friends and neighbors of the Blooms. Philip is deceased. Mentioned in Calypso, Lestrygonians and Ithaca.
Monks.
Dayfather in the printing room in Aeolus. Gifford reports that the "dayfather" was the father of the chapel (a worker's association) for the day staff of the newspaper. Monks is also mentioned in Lestrygonians ("the dayfather") and Eumaeus.
Mooney, Jack.
Brother of Polly Doran (née Mooney). In the Dubliners story "The Boarding-House," when Bob Doran becomes involved with Polly, the looming, unspoken threat of violence from Jack is part of the pressure Doran feels to marry Polly. The Narrator mentions Mooney in Cyclops. He is also mentioned in Lestrygonians and Wandering Rocks.    D
Mooney, Mrs.
Mother of Polly Doran, Bob Doran's mother-in-law. She first appears in the Dubliners story "The Boarding House," where she runs the titular establishment. Her blatant husband-hunting for her daughter is successful after she maneuvers Bob Doran into marriage. In Ulysses, she is mentioned only in Cyclops. The Narrator accuses her of renting rooms in her house for illicit meetings, but it seems unlikely that this is true.   D
Mooney, Polly.
See Doran, Polly.  
Moore, George.
A real-life Irish writer. In Scylla & Charybdis, the librarians discuss a reception or party to be held at Moore's house for up-and-coming young Irish writers. Stephen Dedalus, who is in the room, is quite obviously not included. Moore is also mentioned in Oxen of the Sun when Mulligan and Alec Bannon arrive after going to the party.
Morkan, Julia.
One of Gabriel Conroy's two elderly aunts in "The Dead," a story in Dubliners. In "The Dead," Julia lives with her sister Kate. At that time, she was still the leading soprano at a Catholic church in Dublin. She has passed away by the time of Ulysses, but Bloom still thinks of her voice with admiration in Lestrygonians. She is also mentioned in Ithaca.  D
Morkan, Kate.
One of Gabriel Conroy's two elderly aunts in "The Dead," a story in Dubliners. Kate lives with her sister Julia and teaches music lessons. In Ithaca, she is identified as Stephen Dedalus's godmother. Kate had the care of Julia, who has passed away by the time of Ulysses.  D
Mulligan, Malachi (Buck).
A medical student and Stephen Dedalus's housemate in the Martello tower at Sandycove when Ulysses begins. Mulligan is based on Joyce's real-life friend Oliver St. John Gogarty. Mulligan is witty and intelligent, but also insensitive and boorish. He is often associated with the color yellow, beginning with his dressinggown in the opening scene. He is in or mentioned in nearly every episode in which Stephen appears, starting with his appearance in Telemachus as the first character in the book.  
Mulvey, Lieutenant.
A British naval officer who was one of Molly's early romantic interests. He is mentioned in Nausicaa, Ithaca, and Penelope.
Murphy, W. B.
Able-bodied seaman who tells questionable stories of his travels in Eumaeus.
Nannetti, Joseph Patrick.
A real-life Dublin politician and the foreman at the newspaper office in Aeolus. Nannetti is running for Lord Mayor of Dublin. He appears in Aeolus, Wandering Rocks and Circe, and is mentioned in Lestrygonians, Sirens, Cyclops, and Ithaca.
Narrator, the.
The unnamed narrator of the Cyclops episode. His narrow-minded, mean-spirited commentary sets a tone of violence that carries throughout the episode. In Circe, he is called "The Nameless One" when he appears as a member of a jury made up of many of the men Bloom has faced during the day.
Nolan, John Wyse.
Appears with Martin Cunningham in Wandering Rocks in a discussion about raising funds for Paddy Dignam's family. He is one of the few Dubliners who has kind words to say about Bloom ("there is much kindness in the jew," he says, borrowing from Shakespeare's Merchant of Venice). Nolan also appears in Cyclops, and is mentioned in Lestrygonians and Circe.
O’Connell, John.
Caretaker of Glasnevin Cemetery, where Dignam is buried. He appears in Hades and Circe.
O’Hanlon, Canon.
One of the three priests leading mass at the Star of the Sea church during Nausicaa. See also Father Conroy and John Hughes. He also appears briefly in Circe.
O’Madden Burke, Mr.
A journalist who appears frequently in Aeolus, and is mentioned in Wandering Rocks, Sirens, and Circe. He is also a character from "A Mother" in Dubliners, where he is described as "a suave, elderly man who balanced his imposing body, when at rest, upon a large silk umbrella."   D
O’Molloy, J. J.
A solicitor (lawyer). Although he was once the "[c]leverest fellow at the junior bar," Bloom thinks of him, "Practice dwindling. A mighthavebeen." O’Molloy seems to show a genuine interest in Stephen Dedalus and his opinions in Aeolus. He also appears in Wandering Rocks, Cyclops. and Circe.
O’Neill, Henry J.
The undertaker who handles Paddy Dignam's funeral. Employer of Corny Kelleher. He is mentioned in Lotus Eaters, Wandering Rocks, Cyclops, and Eumaeus.
O’Reilly, Maggot.
Seems to have been a friend of the Blooms. He is mentioned in Circe and appears in the "series" of Molly's former admirers in Ithaca.
O’Rourke, Larry.
Pub owner with whom Bloom has a conversation in Calypso. He also appears in Wandering Rocks and Circe, and is mentioned in Sirens and Penelope.
Parnell, Charles Stewart.
Charismatic leader of the Irish Home Rule movement who died in 1891. His legacy still exerted a strong influence at the time of Ulysses. His public life ended in embarrassment when his long-standing affair with Kitty O’Shea was made public in 1890. Leopold Bloom remembers meeting him in Eumaeus. On the occasion, Bloom picked up Parnell's hat and returned it to him; unlike John Henry Menton in Hades, Parnell seemed appropriately grateful.     P   D
Parnell, John Howard.
Charles Stewart Parnell's brother. At the time of Ulysses he is the Dublin city marhsal, but he is mainly known as "Parnell's brother." He is mentioned in Lestrygonians, and appears in Wandering Rocks and Circe.
Power, Jack.
One of the main characters in the Dubliners story "Grace," where he is identified as a rising star at the Royal Irish Constabulary Office, an quasi-military police unit engaged in supporting the British rule of Ireland. Power rides in the carriage with Bloom, Martin Cunningham, and Simon Dedalus to Paddy Dignam's funeral, and appears with them in other locales. In Hades, Bloom says that he has heard that Power keeps a mistress. Power appears in Hades, Wandering Rocks, Cyclops, and Circe, and is mentioned in Lestrygonians, Eumaeus, Ithaca, and Penelope.   D
Purefoy, Theodore.
An accountant at Ulster Bank and Mina Purefoy's husband. His ability to father a child (or not) is the subject of several ribald jokes in Oxen of the Sun. He appears only in Circe, but is mentioned in Lestrygonians, Oxen of the Sun, and Penelope.
Purefoy, Wilhelmina (Mina).
A friend of Molly Bloom's. She is in her third day of labor with her ninth child during much of Ulysses; the baby is born near the end of Oxen of the Sun. Although she appears only in a fantasy sequence in Circe, Leopold Bloom often thinks sympathetically of her difficult labor. In fact, his visit to the maternity hospital in Oxen is prompted by a desire to seek news of her condition. She is mentioned in Lestrygonians, Wandering Rocks, Sirens, Oxen of the Sun, Ithaca, and Penelope.
Riordan, Dante.
An elderly widow who lived at the City Arms Hotel at the same time as the Blooms. When Stephen Dedalus was young, she also resided for several years with the Dedaluses as a governess. In Ithaca, Leopold Bloom remembers wheeling her around in her wheelchair. Molly says in Penelope that he only helped Mrs. Riordan because he hoped that she would leave them some of her money when she died. She is also mentioned in Hades, Lestrygonians, and Cyclops, and appears briefly in Circe. P
Rochford, Tom.
In the ninth section of Wandering Rocks, Rochford has invented a machine for theaters that shows who is currently onstage during a variety show. Lenehan tells M'Coy how Rochford heroically rescued a sanitation worker overcome by sewer gas, a story based in part on a real event. He appears in Lestrygonians, Wandering Rocks, and Circe; is mentioned in Sirens and Cyclops.
Rubio, Mrs.
Mrs. Rubio was some type of household help for the Tweedys in Gibraltar. She is remembered by Molly Bloom in Penelope.
Rumbold, H.
A barber who also sometimes acts as a hangman. His name was taken from yet another real person who had offended Joyce, the British Minister to Switzerland. The fictional Rumbold's letter detailing his skill as an executioner is read aloud by Joe Hynes in Cyclops. Later in Cyclops, he appears in a parodic newspaper report of the execution of an Irish patriot, Robert Emmet. Rumbold also appears in Circe.
Russell, George (A.E.)
A real-life Irish poet and newspaperman. In Scylla & Charybdis, he leaves Stephen Dedalus out of a collection of up and coming Irish literary stars, but he does agree to see what he can do about publishing Mr. Deasy's letter. He also appears in Lestrygonians, and is mentioned in Nestor, Aeolus, Nausicaa, and Oxen of the Sun.
Sailor, the one-legged.
A beggar who appears in Wandering Rocks and Circe. Molly Bloom throws him a coin from her window in Wandering Rocks, which she remembers later in Penelope.
Sinico, Emily.
In Hades, Leopold Bloom remembers that the last funeral he attended was Mrs. Sinico's. Mrs. Sinico's history is told in "A Painful Case," a story in Dubliners. Unfortunate in her marriage, she met another man (Mr. Duffy) whose friendship made her happy. When she declared her love to him, he abandoned her. She died four years later, after a period of alcoholism, in an accident on the train tracks that was probably suicide. Bloom thinks of her again in Ithaca. D
Skin-the-Goat.
See Fitzharris, James.
Stanhope, Mr. and Mrs.
Mrs. Stanhope (Hester) was a friend of Molly Bloom in Gibraltar. Mr. Stanhope, whom Hester affectionately called "Wogger," was perhaps a little too interested in Molly. They are mentioned only in Penelope.
Stratton, Eugene.
An American performer who toured extensively in Britain and Ireland. Although he was Caucasian, he was known for appearing in blackface. He is mentioned in Hades, Wandering Rocks, and Circe.
Stripling, the blind.
First appears when Leopold Bloom helps him across the street in Lestrygonians. He is a piano tuner, and in Sirens he returns to the bar in the Ormond Hotel to retrieve his tuning fork, which he left there earlier in the day. His progress as he returns to the bar is marked by the "tap" of his cane. He also appears in Wandering Rocks and twice in Circe.
Supple, Bertha.
A friend of the young women on the beach in Nausicaa. She appears briefly early in Circe.
Sweny, F.W.
Owner of "F. W. Sweny and Co (Limited), dispensing chemists." A "chemist" (drugstore) of the same name actually existed in Dublin in 1904, and is still there today. Sweny makes Molly's favorite lotion, and in Calypso, she asks Bloom to get some more for her. Sweny thinks Bloom will return later in the day to get the lotion, so he lets Bloom take a cake of lemon-scented soap on credit. Bloom is reminded of the soap occasionally during the day, and moves it around to various pockets, but he does not return to Sweny's. Sweny appears in Lotus Eaters and Circe, and is mentioned in Ithaca.
Talbot, Florry.
A generously proportioned prostitute in Mrs. Cohen's establishment in Nighttown. Florry appears throughout Circe.
Talboys, Mrs. Mervyn.
One of the well-dressed society women who appear as Bloom's accusers in Circe. The other two are Mrs. Bellingham and Mrs. Yelverton Barry.
Taylor, John F.
A real-life Dublin lawyer and orator. In Aeolus, Professor MacHugh quotes a lengthy passage from one of Taylor's speeches, calling it "[t]he finest display of oratory I ever heard." He also appears in Circe.
Thornton, Mrs.
Midwife who delivered the Blooms' children. She is mentioned in Calypso and Lestrygonians, and she appears briefly in Circe to help Bloom bear eight children.
Tweedy, Brian.
Molly Bloom's father (deceased). He was an officer in the Royal Dublin Fusiliers, stationed for part of his career in Gibraltar, where Molly was born. Bloom thinks of him often, in Calypso, Lotus Eaters, Nausicaa, Circe, Eumaeus, and Ithaca, and Molly mentions him often in Penelope. He is also mentioned in a conversation between Simon Dedalus, Ben Dollard and Father Cowley in Sirens.
Twigg, Lizzie.
One of the women who replied to Bloom's ad for a "smart lady typist to aid gentleman in literary work" (Bloom corresponds with one of the other respondents, Martha Clifford). In Lestrygonians, Bloom remembers Lizzie Twigg's reply: "My literary efforts have had the good fortune to meet with the approval of the eminent poet A. E." Later in Lestrygonians, Bloom sees A.E. with a young woman with loose stockings and wonders if it is Lizzie Twigg. The "rumpled stockings" come up again in Nausicaa.
Virag, Lipoti.
Bloom's grandfather (deceased). In Hungarian, "virag" means "flower." His ghost appears in Circe. He is also mentioned in Nausicaa, Ithaca, and Penelope.
Virag, Rudolf.
See Bloom, Rudolph.
Wetherup.
Like M'Intosh, Wetherup is one of the unexplained mysteries of Ulysses. He is first mentioned in one of the mock newspaper titles in Aeolus, WHAT WETHERUP SAID. "Wetherup always said that," Bloom thinks. Other than a brief mention in Circe, his only other appearance is in Eumaeus, when Bloom thinks as he pays the tab for Stephen's coffee and roll, "and honestly well worth twice the money once in a way, as Wetherup used to remark."
Wylie, Reggy.
The boy that had the bicycle. In Cyclops and Nausicaa, Gerty MacDowell has a crush on a boy with a bicycle who is named Reggy Wylie. She dreams of being Mrs. Reggy Wylie, although his family is Protestant and her Catholic parents would not approve. Gerty says that Reggy wants to go to Trinity College to study to be a doctor like his brother, W. E. Wylie.
Wylie, W. E.
A real-life Dublin cyclist and fictional brother of Reggy Wylie, the object of Gerty MacDowell's crush in Nausicaa. Gerty describes him as a medical student. Wylie participates in a bicycle race on June 16, 1904, which is mentioned in Wandering Rocks and also (according to Gifford) in the real-life Dublin Evening Telegraph for that day.
Yelverton Barry, Mrs.
A well-dressed, proper society matron (fictional) who is one of Bloom's accusers in Circe. She appears with Mrs. Mervyn Talboys and Mrs. Bellingham.
Adams, Robert Martin.Surface and Symbol.New York: Oxford UP, 1962.Benstock, Shari and Bernard Benstock.Who's He When He's at Home: A James Joyce Directory.Urbana: U of Illinois P, 1980.Ellmann, Richard.James Joyce.Revised Edition. New York: Oxford UP, 1982.Fargnoli, A. Nicholas and Michael P. Gillespie.James Joyce A to Z: The Essential Reference to His Life and Writings.New York: Oxford UP, 1996.Gifford, Don and Robert J. Seidman.Ulysses Annotated: Notes for James Joyce's Ulysses.2nd ed. Berkeley: U California Press, 1988.